Tim

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  • in reply to: No honey in supers – should I worry? #3080
    Tim
    Participant

    Morning Paul,

    Some colonies will do very well and some will struggle just finding enough forage to keep going.

    It can depend on your area and what is available at the time. That does vary greatly.

    A colony needs to have enough bees to spare to go out scouting for new sources and bring it home.

    nother variable, and don’t want to worry you here, is that the colony in question might be struggling for other reasons – – – queen not laying sufficiently or health problems (Nosema for example).

    So many variables.

    But the most important thing to remember is to check to see if they have enough stores until your next inspection. If there is a ‘June Gap’ or inclement weather the colony can starve quickly if they have no reserves. So it is very important to ‘heft’ your brood box (take the roof off first) or visually check the brood frames to see if they have stores. Note that if there is a gap the queen can often go ‘off lay’ for a while until there is another flow. This is sometimes misinterpreted as a missing queen (no eggs or queen seen). But she will pick up as soon as the flow starts.

    Hope that helps.

    in reply to: Spare Crown Board #3068
    Tim
    Participant

    Hello Ray,

    I have a spare crown board if you need one, (whenever).

    in reply to: I think they are swarming… #3043
    Tim
    Participant

    Thats lucky.

    I have had 2 like thatand right now need to go through my hives to check that no more qc’s have been created in last 5 days. But it is mighty windy here.

    Easy to forget to check again a few days after reducing qc’s. Remembering that they can still create queens from a larva 2-4 days old (7 days from laid egg).

    in reply to: What are your bees foraging on? #2989
    Tim
    Participant

    KEEPING USEFUL STRUCTURES ON PLANTS
    Many plants, such as cotton, have sugar-secreting glands called nectaries both inside and outside of flowers. Many species of natural enemies feed on these sugars. Plant breeding has eliminated nectaries in some crops, and this is sometimes done to deny pests access to the carbohydrate resources. The decision to eliminate or retain nectaries needs to be based on studies of the net benefit to pest control of these structures. Plants (e.g., grapes) also often have on their leaves pits or pockets, called domatia, that provide physical refuges for phytoseiid mites. Varieties with domatia often have higher phytoseiid densities and fewer pest mites. Retention of such structures in new crop varieties may be important and should be an explicit part of plant breeding.

    in reply to: What are your bees foraging on? #2987
    Tim
    Participant

    I  wrote a further post yesterday but it somehow didnt make it to the forum.

    It was about Poplars. We have black poplars at the bottom of our garden. They have male and female trees. Once a year we hae a snowstorm.

    So perhaps only one sex has EFN’s?

    Also it would be useful to find tbe best available pollen chart.

    I used to have a very good one but since lost with last laptop.

    Tbe Sheffield Beekeepers Association have quite a good one

    in reply to: What are your bees foraging on? #2981
    Tim
    Participant

    Aha!

    Both reading the same article!

    in reply to: What are your bees foraging on? #2979
    Tim
    Participant

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2759261/

    Above is a link to an article about Aspens and extra floral nectaries.

    in reply to: What are your bees foraging on? #2975
    Tim
    Participant

    Chris,

    Trees have extra-floral nectaries as well as some plants like field beans. They are supposedly for beneficial (to the plant) insects such as ants.

    So perhaps this is what the bees were foraging? I know that honey bees find field beans difficult to access unless other bees have nibbled holes in the base of the flowers; but they do utilise the extra-floral nectaries.

    By the way I was wrong about the brick red pollen which is (according to Margery’s pollen chart) dandelion.

    in reply to: Problem with mesh floor #2969
    Tim
    Participant

    ray,

    It is worth screwing them down anyway. Mine originally were secured by drawing pins but that was never going to last forever.

    I recently bought some queen excluders from Thornes and am not really happy with them. A bit flimsy and not easy to clean on one side.

    in reply to: What are your bees foraging on? #2889
    Tim
    Participant

    We have some rape nearby but a greatly reduced crop. Apart from that there is cherry blossom, apple and other tree blossom. My nees are bringing in rape, dandelion and blackthorn which is a striking brick red colour.

Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 30 total)